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Here’s When to Get Your Older Kids Their Booster Shot

Picture: Marina Demidiuk (Shutterstock)Teenagers are now eligible for booster dosages of their COVID-19 vaccine, the CDC has revealed. Previously, boosters were just for adults aged 18 and up. Kids with weakened immune systems can now also get a third primary dose, even if they are not old enough for a booster.The timeline is also different for teenagers than for the general population. While the rest of us need to get a booster 6 months after completing our preliminary series, kids aged 12 to 17 must get their booster 5 months after their 2nd dose.So far, were only talking about Pfizer vaccines. Moderna and Johnson & & Johnson vaccines are not authorized for this age. (Theres a chart here showing which vaccines are authorized for which age groups if you forget, which even I often do.) The recommendations for kids age 5 and up are therefore: First shot of PfizerAt least 3 weeks later on, a 2nd dosage of PfizerIf the kid is at least 12 years old, then five months after the 2nd shot, they can get a booster dosage of Pfizer.The CDC has also suggested a 3rd primary dose for kids over age 5 who are “reasonably to severely” immunocompromised. Technically this is ruled out a booster; they just have a three-dose main series instead of a two-dose series. This now matches the suggestion for immunocompromised grownups. A vaccine schedule for an immunocompromised kid would appear like this: First shot of PfizerAt least three weeks later on, a 2nd shot of PfizerAt least four week after the second shot, a 3rd dose of PfizerIf the kid is at least 12 years old, then five months after the third shot, they can get a booster dose of Pfizer. These schedules are the same when it comes to adults, with the exception that boosters for 12-to-17-year-olds come 5 months after the last main shot, whereas that window is 6 months for adults.